WordPress Family Awards

Well after only 4 months of blogging, not only have we been taken aback on the number of folks who read our blog and give us some great feedback, but Mart has given us another wonderful surprise and nominated us for the WordPress Family Award!!!!

So with one huge thank you to Mart http://onemanandhismustang.com who kindly nominated our little blog for this award.

wordpressfam1

As with all these awards the rules are quite simple:

1. Display the award logo on your blog.

2. Link back to the person who nominated you.

3. Nominate 10 others you see as having an impact on your WordPress experience and family

4. Let your 10 Family members know you have awarded them

5. That is it. Just please pick 10 people who have taken you as a friend, and spread the love

This is where for us it gets a little difficult and a little embarrassing, we seam to spend a lot of time on our blog but shamefully we don’t get to look around at others as much as we would like…

1) has to be Mart – http://onemanandhismustang.com, having followed us we are still getting through reading through some of his archives, lovely car there Mart!!!!

2) Charlecote Park – http://charlecoteparknt.wordpress.com, a wonderful place that we visited this year during our ESM and lovely to see what is happening there.

3) Paladin Glass – http://paladinglass.co.uk, after this very cleaver lady made a fab Stag tea light holder for me, I love to see what else she has done!

and I am sorry to say that these are the ones so far as we just haven’t had the time to read more but we promise that will change over the winter months!!!

Its great to be part of the Family 🙂

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A Job for the Weekend – the brakes

So to continue our journey on the rolling restoration of our Stag, we decided that it was time to sort the spongy brakes that have come about in the last couple of weeks.

First we checked that we were not loosing brake fluid and as the reservoir was at the same level as it was a few months earlier when it was last checked its not a problem with it escaping anywhere!

As the pedal was soft when pressed slowly down but if then you take your foot off and then put it straight back on again and it was nice and firm its got to be air or seals in the master cylinder. We had a similar problem with our old Triumph Spitfire a few years ago and that was cured by replacing the master cylinder so a new one (reconditioned) was sourced on Saturday morning.

We had done some research friday evening on how big the job was going to be and make sure that we were going to be able to tackle this without any of our experienced folks in the club on hand for help. Having read through the manual (you must always consult the workshop manual before starting any job and always follow the instructions) and quite a few posts on the forum we decided that we were happy to do the change over (as we had previous experience of bleeding the brakes under supervision we were happy with that aspect). We did get some advice from Mick when we bought the new one that we should be able to get the master cylinder off without removing the servo unit from the car as the manual states, this is due to the lower bolt being difficult to remove – so we were going to try without and see how we got on.

So as we are talking about lots of bolts and screws that are going to go from fairly hard to loosen to ones that challenge the patience , and as we are talking about needing to bleed all the way round the car we decided to ensure that all the bleed nipples were both accessible and not seized up as well as all the bolts on the master cylinder itself were going to come undone.

A few (well quite a few) sprays of WD40 later the front nipples were freed off, rear were ok as we had refurbed them a year or so ago, and the bolts on the master cylinder to the servo and on the brake lines were also not too difficult to free off – happy days no seized screws or bolts to contend with!!

First we emptied the reservoir by bleeding the rear and front furthest from the master cylinder, not a small amount of dirt in the bottom!!

old res

Next we removed the brake lines from the cylinder – good large piece of rag underneath to catch any fluid remaining and to then wrap the ends to keep the dirt out.

The two bolts fixing the master cylinder to the servo were removed and yes the bottom one is a bit tight to get a socket onto it but thats when small hands come in handy!!! Then the cylinder was withdrawn from the servo – now this sounds easy but as there is a spring and some seals this did require a bit of a tug, when it did release it came out a bit sharpish (bit of a shock)

old removing

old one on its way out!

inside servo

inside servo after MC removed

Old and new

Old and new together before fitting new to the car

New one is simply placed into the hole in the servo and secured with the same spring washers and bolts, and the brake lines attached (after taking out the red blanking plugs – these were left in until ready to attach the lines to keep any dirt from getting in)

new in place

new on in place

brake line connection

ready to connect the brake lines

Once connected up, its time to fill up the new reservoir with dot 4 fluid, and check the master cylinder connections for leaks.

Then the joyous task of bleeding all 4 wheels, starting with the back and furthest away from the master cylinder checking to make sure all the air is removed.

Another job tackled and completed, and more importantly much improved braking!!

new installed

Ta-dah!!

PLEASE NOTE – these are NOT instructions on how to undertake this job just some pics and words of our experiences, always consult professionals when undertaking any repairs or restorations. (please refer to the disclaimer on our about page)

So what did we do last summer, part 1…

Image

So as the nights are starting to draw in, the weather is getting colder and wetter (well for those in the east this weekend that’s a little bit of an understatement!!!) and the opportunities for us car lovers to get out there and enjoy a bit of topless driving are disappearing until spring. We thought you would like to see some of the best bits of this summer as told our social following and friends.

So here’s some highligts of the summer from Twitter….

8 May 2013  @derek_maxwell Perfect symmetry at Woodhenge on Wiltshire area drive it day

8 May 2013
@derek_maxwell
Perfect symmetry at Woodhenge on Wiltshire area drive it day

18 May 2013 @StagOwnersClub European Stag Meeting

18 May 2013
@StagOwnersClub
European Stag Meeting
and STAR 90

4 June 2013 @alanhymers Freddie loves the Triumph Stag, especialy with the hood down!!

4 June 2013
@alanhymers
Freddie loves the Triumph Stag, especialy with the hood down!!

12 June 2013 @markgiudici After 12 year restoration my 1971 MK1 Triumph stag is finally on the road! Yippee!!

12 June 2013
@markgiudici
After 12 year restoration my 1971 MK1 Triumph stag is finally on the road! Yippee!!

22 June 2013 @nickwheatley1 A new acquisition. Wanted one for years

22 June 2013
@nickwheatley1
A new acquisition. Wanted one for years

7 July 2013 @derek maxwell Bath motor pageant

7 July 2013
@derek_maxwell
Bath motor pageant

7 July 2013 @drgoon2001 Seaton Tramway in Devon today

7 July 2013
@drgoon2001
Seaton Tramway in Devon today

9 July 2013 @drgoon2001 At West Bay – does this count for being on tour?

9 July 2013
@drgoon2001
At West Bay – does this count for being on tour?

13 July 2013 @gingereagle Just back from a 1500 mile trip to Scotland stag didn’t miss a beat

13 July 2013
@gingereagle
Just back from a 1500 mile trip to Scotland stag didn’t miss a beat

14 July 2013 @markgiudici Enjoying the sun at Barton Marina

14 July 2013
@markgiudici
Enjoying the sun at Barton Marina

14 July 2013 @scottb061081 Stag spotted in Monaco

14 July 2013
@scottb061081
Stag spotted in Monaco

15 July 2013 @Derek Maxwell Panoramic view of stags at Atwell-Wilson Show in the sun

15 July 2013
@Derek Maxwell
Panoramic view of stags at Atwell-Wilson Show in the sun

7 August 2013 @Derek_maxwell Crown inn bishops cannings run out

7 August 2013
@Derek_maxwell
Crown inn bishops cannings run out

11 August 2013 @Derek_maxwell Gorge’eous day at Cheddar, stunning!!

11 August 2013
@Derek_maxwell
Gorge’eous day at Cheddar, stunning!!

27 August 2013 @nickwheatley1 Bank Holiday but the river. Couldn’t be better…

27 August 2013
@nickwheatley1
Bank Holiday by the river. Couldn’t be better…

24 September 2013 @nickwheatley1 Late afternoon Pint me thinks!

24 September 2013
@nickwheatley1
Late afternoon Pint me thinks!

28 September 2013 @jhoggarth89 Photo shoot

28 September 2013
@jhoggarth89
Photo shoot

6 October 2013 @derek maxwell Carmine stag out in the forest, King Alfred’s Tower bathed in sunlight behind

6 October 2013
@derek_maxwell
Carmine stag out in the forest, King Alfred’s Tower bathed in sunlight behind

26 July 2013 @DrKenBMoody Triumph stag summer 1976

And lastly a memory of a summer past
26 July 2013
@DrKenBMoody
Triumph stag summer 1976

And not quite sure this is the sort of Stag we were looking for…

STag 7apr

@chrishope86
Stag at Burleigh house but no badge

Stag Reunited

We love to hear about our members and fellow Stag owners stories of ownership and what they have been up to with their pride and Joy. Here is a great story from Andrew…..

When I bought my car in early 2007 it came with quite a large history file going back to 1989 including receipts for huge amounts of restoration work, mots, tax discs etc but no Heritage Certificate which I sent for within a few weeks of buying the car.

Surprisingly all the numbers still matched including all the keys but it also showed the car no longer had it’s original registration number. But as my 2000 estate had lost it’s number at 3 years old due to having a private plate fitted I wasn’t really bothered. However, unlike the 2000, the certificate did show the original number of KCK42N.

This must have been in the back of my mind as to why this happened. Had the car been written off? Did someone want to keep the original number? By 2011 whatever the reason I decided I wanted to know and contacted DVLA who advised me to fill in form V888 which I did and sent it off with the £5 fee.

The information which was copies of all the previous owners documents arrived a couple of days after the Norfolk National and I found the 1986 -1989 owner, Mark Balfour had lived about ½ mile from the hotel we were staying at. Had the information arrived a week earlier I would have gone and knocked on the door to see if he still lived there.

It also explained the change of number. In 1978 the car was bought by a Henry Travis who had the number HST 99 fitted to the car and at this time the original number was lost. When he sold the car it was issued with it’s current JTA608N.

The car was supplied new by Hebden Bros, Springs Garage, Todmorden and was supplied to F&T Lumb Ltd of Hebden Bridge  and over the next 11 years it had another 10 owners, one for 4 days so presumably a dealer and was twice sold without documents. It also moved around quite a bit, going from Yorkshire to Lancashire, Devon, Hampshire, Herefordshire, Gloucestershire, Wiltshire, Norfolk and back to Yorkshire before I brought it to Derbyshire.

Having worked in Todmorden at one time and knowing the area quite well, when I was told there was a good Vintage Weekend in Hebden Bridge it seemed like a good idea, so form filled in, a room booked in a local pub and we were all set for the weekend. Knowing that if owners put something on their car telling it’s story people do tend to read it so I decided to put a note on the car along with the usual information asking for information about the supplying garage and F &T Lumb. I didn’t really expect to find out much but was hoping it might turn up a dealer sticker, a key fob or possibly someone who knew of the original owner and possibly remembered the car.

We hadn’t been there that long and we had had a walk round when a man, whose name I didn’t get came and told me he had probably done the pre delivery inspection on the car as he worked at the garage during the ‘70s and although they were a multiple BL dealer he did mostly Triumphs. He told me the garage is still there but has been redeveloped and is a filling station. The next person introduced himself as Derek Carlton Crabtree who told me F&T Lumb were egg producers and poultry farmers and suggested I went to the visitors gate and ask for Derek Sutcliffe  as he was part of the family and he may be able to help. It turned out it was his car, he had it new as a company car. He had seen me drive in but obviously didn’t recognise the number so thought no more of it so was quite shocked when I told him the story. We also met Stephen Barker, a friend of Derek’s who was at the show with a Ford GT40 replica who also remembered the car well.

As this is a Rotary Club event and Derek is involved with the weekend we had our photos taken for their newsletter and a photo also appeared in the Hebden Bridge Times which Derek very kindly sent me along with a couple of  photos taken while he owned the car.

He had the car for 3 years and during that time it had the head gaskets replaced twice after overheating near Keighley and then Penrith. It overheated again in Bristol when Derek’s brother had borrowed it, which apparently took some time to repair as British Leyland were on strike and there were no parts for it.

In March 1978 the car was sold and went to a dealer friend of Derek’s, Geoff Gladsbrook at Hawksclough, Mytholmroyd who used the car for a while until he also encountered overheating problems and sold the car on, presumably to another dealer in Blackburn called Charles Pavelyn as this is the second name the car was registered in. In April 1978 the car was sold to Henry Travis who transferred the private number on to the car.

All in all this was a very good weekend and I think 2 of us had our day made. We were asked to go back next year which we will as it is such a good weekend. Due to the number of exhibits we were there on Saturday, Sunday being for pre 1971.

For info on this yearly event see Hebden Bridge Vintage Weekend

And take a look at the photos from this years event Photos from 2013